There are a wide range of educational opportunities across Columbia University and Columbia University Irving Medical Center for every career stage.

High School & Undergraduate

CURE (currently postponed due to COVID-19) – The HICCC CURE program encourages high school and undergraduate students to pursue careers in cancer research and provides mentorship. This pipeline program aims to strengthen the pool of underrepresented minorities, economically disadvantaged groups, and first-generation college students entering into cancer-related research fields.  To realize our goals, during the summer students gain hands-on cancer research experiences in basic, clinical, or population sciences and participate in director-led training activities.

Contact: Kimberly Burke (email: krb2160@cumc.columbia.edu)

Undergraduate Only

SURF (currently postponed due to COVID-19) - The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) is a summer research training program for undergraduates enrolled at Columbia College, Barnard College, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, or the School of General Studies. Prospective trainees apply after identifying a Columbia University faculty member who has agreed to mentor them in a biology-related research project. Non-Columbia students admitted through the Amgen Scholars Program, the Genentech Fellowship or the Simons Fellowship with a Columbia University faculty mentor are admitted to SURF at Columbia. The program is administered by the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University with institutional support provided by Columbia College, Barnard College, the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Columbia University, CUIMC, and the Columbia School of General Studies. Financial support is also provided by the Amgen Foundation, the Genentech Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

In 2019, 18 of 68 SURF participants were mentored by HICCC members.

Learn more about the program, including how to apply.

Contact: Chanda Springer (email cs2660@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2262).

PrIMER

Program to Inspire Minority Undergraduates in Environmental Health Science Research (PrIMER) is run by the Environmental Health Sciences Department of the Mailman School of Public Health and is funded by NIEHS R25ES025505. The Program provides a research experience in environmental health science with a stipend to undergraduates from underrepresented populations in the U.S. biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences research enterprise beginning June before their junior year through December of their senior year.

Click here for more information on the program

Click here to apply

Contact: Nina Kulacki, Program Director (njk2128@cumc.columbia.edu)

Predoctoral/Graduate Training Programs

T35 Training Grants

NIH-T35 institutional training grants at Columbia University Irving Medical Center from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and National Institute on Aging (NIA) provide funds to support up to 61 students in the summer between their 1st and 2nd years of medical school as they perform research projects guided by a Columbia faculty member. The three T35 Programs collectively comprise the NIH Summer Research Program at CUIMC, to which student apply through a common interface (see below). VP&S students have priority for traineeships, with additional traineeships annually awarded to selected students at other medical schools.

Each Institute prioritizes projects within their research mission, and many cancer-related projects qualify on this basis. A few traineeships are also available to students who apply with experienced investigators in other fields and whose projects are well-reviewed.

Resources for applicants and trainees are available on the NIH Summer Research Program Canvas site. To learn more about the program, including how to apply, click here.

Contact: Stuart Fischer (email: sgf2@cumc.columbia.edu)

Graduate Training Program in Microbiology and Immunology

This NAID-funded training program provides funds for two years for selected predoctoral students who have attained dissertator status within the PhD program in Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection, which is based in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Click here for more information about the Department’s graduate Programs

Human Nutrition Research Project

The PhD Program in Nutritional and Metabolic Biology is an inter-disciplinary and multi-departmental training program that is housed within the Institute of Human Nutrition of Columbia University. Research focuses on applying knowledge of the molecular and cellular events that lead to and promote cancer development to the design of cancer therapies and prevention strategies. Past projects of interest involve carcinogenesis of digestive organs.

Click here for application information

Cellular, Molecular & Biomedical Studies

This Training grant supports pre-doctoral students in the Integrated Program in Cellular, Molecular and Biomedical Studies (CMBS). The CMBS is a PhD granting interdisciplinary program that combines faculty from all the basic science departments. The CMBS Program is an umbrella program that presents students with a unique opportunity to obtain individualized training in basic cell and molecular biology, microbiology, structural biology, biophysics, genetics, immunology, neurobiology, structural biology, systems biology and computational biology, as well as translational biomedical disease-related research, such as cancer biology and neurodegenerative disease research.

Click here for more information.

Reducing Health Disparities Through Informatics

The NINR funded Reducing Health Disparities Thorough Informatics (RHeaDI) program provides training in informatics for pre- and post-doctoral students in the Columbia School of Nursing. The program provides trainees with research support, didactic courses, networking opportunities, and financial assistance to conduct interdisciplinary research using informatics and precision medicine approaches to advance health equity and facilitate evidence-based practice in underserved populations. Predoctoral trainees must be PhD students in nursing or biomedical informatics.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Bakken, RHeaDI Director and Principal Investigator, at sbh22@cumc.columbia.edu.

Predoctoral Training in Genetics & Development

The objectives of the Predoctoral Training Program in Genetics and Development are to provide a solid and broad education in genetics, including molecular genetics, developmental genetics, and human genetics, to provide rigorous training in scientific research, and to develop a scholarly, ethical and professional attitude in the trainees. The program emphasizes experimental skills and critical thinking, as well as written and oral presentation of ideas and research findings. We teach our students a rigorous scientific approach in the design of experiments and evaluation of data, and provide them with the tools to maintain the highest ethical standards in their work. We encourage students to give and receive constructive criticism and challenge them to be self-critical in order to become capable, independent scholars.

For more information, including how to apply, please contact:
Jessica Sama, js1023@cumc.columbia.edu

Environmental Life Course Epidemiology

In collaboration with the Mailman School of Public Health, this training program will equip researchers in the emerging field of life course epidemiology, a relatively new area of inquiry which involves the study of early life circumstances and health outcomes later in life.

To learn more about the program, including how to apply, click here.

Medical Scientist Training Program

The goal of Columbia's Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) is to train the next generation of biomedical leaders. Our program emphasizes both clinical and scientific education. The academic environment at Columbia fosters innovative scholarship and nurtures the vision to translate scientific findings to clinical practice.

To learn more about the program, including how to apply, click here.

Hormones: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

The Hormones: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program provides support and training to highly motivated predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers in the field of endocrinology and related subjects dealing with all aspects of hormone biology at the physiological, cellular and molecular levels.

For more information, including how to apply, contact:
Jessica Sama, js1023@cumc.columbia.edu.

Training in Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University (DBMI)

The NLM-funded Biomedical informatics Training Program at Columbia University is run by the Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI), but is closely tied to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, the Columbia Data Science Institute, the Department of Systems Biology, and departments and schools throughout the university. The Program offers courses and research training for 1) pre-doctoral PhD trainees and 2) post-doctoral MA and PhD trainees, as well as for 3) post-doctoral non-degree trainees with previous informatics doctoral training.

For more information, contact:

Director of Graduate Studies, Noemie Elhadad, PhD - noemie.elhadad@columbia.edu

or

Administrative Contact, Marina Bonanno, EdM - mmb2058@cumc.columbia.edu

F30/F31 Predoctoral Fellowships

F30 and F31 Awards are NIH-funded, individual, pre-doctoral training fellowships. These awards are part of the NIH Ruth L. Kirstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Program. Eligibility for F30 awards require that the applicant be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, enrolled in a dual degree program, such as a combined MD/PhD program.

Click here for more information on F30 programs

F31 awards are open to U.S. citizens or permanent residents enrolled in a research doctoral program, who are from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research workforce.

Click here for more information on F31 awards

The TL1 Doctoral Student Program

The TL1 Training Programs are intended to provide trainees with additional research training to prepare for a research career that can contribute in some meaningful way to understanding risk of disease, improving diagnosis and prevention, and tailoring treatment based on an individual’s variation in genes, environment, and/or lifestyle.

The TL1 Doctoral Program provides doctoral students with one to two years of research training, which run simultaneously with students’ ongoing doctoral training. The program allows doctoral students to gain knowledge and skill-sets that may be outside of their primary academic or clinical discipline. The interdisciplinary education gained as a TL1 trainee will serve as an invaluable asset in conducting future research and collaborating with scientists and investigators from other clinical and academic fields of knowledge. Participation in this program will not necessitate extending an individual’s doctoral training program. Initially awarded for one year and renewed for a second year with satisfactory progress.

Click here for more information or email: ctsa_edu@cumc.columbia.edu

TL1 Summer Training Program

The TL1 Training Programs are intended to provide trainees with additional research training to prepare for a research career that can contribute in some meaningful way to understanding risk of disease, improving diagnosis and prevention, and tailoring treatment based on an individual’s variation in genes, environment, and/or lifestyle.

The TL1 Summer Training Program provides doctoral students who have completed their first (or in some cases, second) year of training with a summer stipend over the 12-week program. Students are expected to attend didactic training as well as participate in experiential learning. The program allows doctoral students to gain knowledge and skill-sets that may be outside of their primary academic or clinical discipline. The interdisciplinary education gained as a TL1 trainee will serve as an invaluable asset in conducting future research and collaborating with scientists and investigators from other clinical and academic fields of knowledge.

Click here for more information or email: ctsa_edu@cumc.columbia.edu

Postdoctoral Training Programs

The TL1 Postdoctoral Fellow Program

The TL1 Training Programs are intended to provide trainees with additional research training to prepare for a research career that can contribute in some meaningful way to understanding risk of disease, improving diagnosis and prevention, and tailoring treatment based on an individual’s variation in genes, environment, and/or lifestyle.

The TL1 Postdoctoral program provides postdoctoral fellows with one to two years of support to participate in an integrated didactic and mentored training program. Postdoctoral candidates are required to dedicate full-time to research and training related to precision medicine. The Irving Institute support includes funds for stipend (stipend level is determined by the number of full years of relevant postdoctoral experience when the award is issued), travel expenses, training-related expenses such as supplies and health insurance, and tuition and fees in accordance with NIH policy. Initially awarded for one year and renewed for a second year with satisfactory progress.

Click here for more information or email: ctsa_edu@cumc.columbia.edu

Training Program in Cancer-Related Population Sciences

The Cancer Training Program in the Department of Epidemiology is home to an NCI-funded training grant, a T32 program, which is a collaboration among the School’s Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health Sciences. This program supports four trainees, all postdoctoral, all engaged in cancer-related studies and research.

To learn more about the program, including how to apply, click here.

Multidisciplinary Training in Translational Gastrointestinal and Liver

The program's mission is to train MD and MD/PhD trainees to become independent basic, clinical and translational researchers in gastroenterology and hepatology. The program faculty is multidisciplinary and includes mentors not only in the Department of Medicine and Department of Pediatrics but also in other departments, institutes and centers at Columbia University. Trainees choose to pursue research in three broad thematic areas and select a mentor in one of these areas:

  1. Basic gastroenterology research
  2. Basic liver research
  3. Clinical epidemiology/precision medicine

Trainees devote most of their effort to a mentored research project but also complete a rigorous program of didactic instruction, including, if they chose, the opportunity to obtain a master's degree in clinical research. In addition, strong emphasis is given to training in the responsible conduct of research and in rigor and reproducibility.

To learn more about the program, including how to apply, please contact:
Steven Muhammad, srm2174@cumc.columbia.edu

Molecular Oncology Training Program

The Molecular Oncology Training Program at Columbia University provides training in research techniques that will form the foundation for careers in cancer medicine. Part of the Hematology/Oncology fellowship program at Columbia University, this comprehensive two-year program (T32) is comprised of didactics, workshops, small group sessions, coursework, including a possible master's degree, and individualized training within the research programs of Columbia University faculty. The trainees (MD or MD/PhD) will be chosen on the basis of past accomplishments and their potential to develop careers as productive, independent translational investigators.

For more information about the program, including how to apply, email: hemoncgrants@cumc.columbia.edu

Reducing Health Disparities Through Informatics

The NINR funded Reducing Health Disparities Thorough Informatics (RHeaDI) program provides training in informatics for pre- and post-doctoral students in the Columbia School of Nursing. The program provides trainees with research support, didactic courses, networking opportunities, and financial assistance to conduct interdisciplinary research using informatics and precision medicine approaches to advance health equity and facilitate evidence-based practice in underserved populations.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Bakken, RHeaDI Director and Principal Investigator, at sbh22@cumc.columbia.edu.

Hormones: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

The Hormones: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program provides support and training to highly motivated predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers in the field of endocrinology and related subjects dealing with all aspects of hormone biology at the physiological, cellular and molecular levels.

For more information, including how to apply, contact:
Jessica Sama, js1023@cumc.columbia.edu

Training in Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University (DBMI)

The NLM-funded Biomedical informatics Training Program at Columbia University is run by the Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI), but is closely tied to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, the Columbia Data Science Institute, the Department of Systems Biology, and departments and schools throughout the university. The Program offers courses and research training for 1) pre-doctoral PhD trainees and 2) post-doctoral MA and PhD trainees, as well as for 3) post-doctoral non-degree trainees with previous informatics doctoral training.

For more information, contact:

Director of Graduate Studies, Noemie Elhadad, PhD (noemie.elhadad@columbia.edu)
or
Administrative Contact, Marina Bonanno, EdM (mmb2058@cumc.columbia.edu)

Neurology Research Education and Mentorship Program

The Neurology Research Education and Mentorship Program is run by Columbia’s Neurology Department. Each year, at least one resident in neurology, neurosurgery, or other resident interested in neuroscience, who is considered to have exceptional promise to become an independent neuroscience researcher, is selected. The focus is on a practical, mentor-directed research experience, with limited classroom time, and residents who participate in this program will be optimally situated to compete for mentored career awards (K awards) at the completion of the two-year training experience bridging residency and fellowship.

For more information, contact: mse13@cumc.columbia.edu

Training Opportunities for Junior Faculty

Hematology/Medical Oncology Fellowship

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplantation Program

R38 CAPRI: Columbia Cancer Training Program for Resident Investigators

Columbia Summer Research Institute

 (now online via Zoom for Summer, 2020)

The Columbia Summer Research Institute is a program of the Mailman School of Public Health. It is an intensive 5-week summer classroom experience for post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty in clinical disciplines, which is designed to enhance their competitiveness in pursuit of grant funding. The curriculum includes biostatistics, epidemiology, race and health, decision and cost-effective analysis, and grant writing.

For more information, go to: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/research/columbia-summer-research-institute-csri

Email: csri@cumc.columbia.edu

KL2 Mentored Career Development Award

The KL2 Mentored Career Development Award combines didactic training, mentoring, exposure to multidisciplinary research, and ongoing evaluation to prepare young investigators for careers in patient oriented research (POR). The award serves as a "bridge" by which young junior faculty can achieve research independence. KL2 scholars complete a rigorous training program that guarantees exposure to a wide range of clinical and translational research methods in both classroom and experiential settings.

To learn more about the program, including how to apply, click here.

Contact: ctsa_edu@cumc.columbia.edu