Phase II Trial of Adjuvant Crizotinib in High-Risk Uveal Melanoma Following Definitive Therapy

Protocol: 
AAAO8010
Phase: 
II

Phase II Trial of Adjuvant Crizotinib in High-Risk Uveal Melanoma Following Definitive Therapy

Uveal melanoma is a type of cancer that starts in the back of the eye. It is going to be treated with surgery or radiation. After this treatment, about half of all uveal melanomas come back in another part of the body, called metastasis. A routine test is available that can predict whether a tumor has a high or low chance of coming back. Tumors that have a high chance of coming back are called “high risk” tumors. So far, there is no known way to stop the cancer from coming back after surgery or radiation for the eye. Crizotinib is an anticancer pill that is FDA approved for patients with some kinds of lung cancer. It blocks the spread of uveal melanoma in the laboratory. The purpose of the treatment part of the study is to find out what effects crizotinib has, good and/or bad, on people with “high risk” uveal melanoma after surgery or radiation for the eye. It is thought that giving crizotinib to patients with “high risk” uveal melanoma can lower the chance the cancer will come back. Subjects who enroll on the study will be asked to take crizotinib at a dose of 250 mg, one pill, twice every day for 48 weeks.

Are you Eligible? (Inclusion Criteria)

1. Primary diagnosis of uveal melanoma
2. Therapy of the primary uveal melanoma by either surgery or radiotherapy performed within 90 days of initiating protocol therapy.
3. High-risk (class 2) uveal melanoma as determined by gene expression profiling

Specialty Area(s)

Trial Location

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
161 Fort Washington Ave.
Herbert Irving Pavilion
New York, NY 10032
United States